Sunitha krishnan

This incident served as the impetus for what she does today. After obtaining a bachelor's degree in environmental sciences from St. As she had a leadership role in organizing the protests, Krishnan was in judicial custody for two months.

Sunitha krishnan

This description of Sunitha Krishnan's work was prepared when Sunitha Krishnan was elected to the Ashoka Fellowship in Introduction Sunitha Krishnan is making it possible for India's government Sunitha krishnan citizen organizations to manage jointly a range of protective and rehabilitative services for children who have been trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation.

The New Idea Sunitha has a blueprint for citizen-state collaboration in dealing with the widespread trafficking of children, a problem that is largely hidden.

Although laws, activists, and organizations are already devoted Sunitha krishnan this issue, the overall approach has been too piecemeal and reactive to make much of a dent in the systemic problems that permit trafficking to thrive.

Sunitha, who knows the dangers of this work as well as anyone, sees a solution in a system of joint management and mutual accountability between state authorities and the civil sector. Sunitha recognizes the strengths and limitations of both the citzen and state sectors. The state alone has the money and authority to liberate, house, and protect children on a larger scale.

But money and authority are not enough. In fact, when these resources are misused they compound misery rather than alleviate it. The citizen sector has the drive, insight, and creativity needed to help the state put its money and authority to the right use.

But in the area of trafficking and child protection, civil society lacks the structure and coordination, in addition to the money and mandate that would enable it to deal with this complex problem.

It is not that organizations do not take on trafficking, as there are many that do and succeed nobly. But the lack of political support limits the ultimate systemic impact. An important object of Sunitha's reform is the existing system of "transit homes" run by the state.

Transit homes are supposed to function as safe houses and rehabilitation centers, but in reality they are often dysfunctional way stations from which children emerge in worse condition than when they entered. By reorganizing so that citizen organizations can manage and monitor transit homes together within the state, Sunitha lifts the veil of secrecy that often permits abuse under the neglectful eye of the state working alone.

She further extends the role of the transit home to include improved counseling and family reintegration. Joint management allows citizen organizations a voice and some oversight in the running of the homes, but it does not burden them with the challenge of fundraising and bureaucracy that would be required if they were to compete by establishing their own homes.

While on the local level joint management puts new, perhaps unwelcome, scrutiny on police, transit home staff, and caseworkers, it also fosters better state regulation by placing all local efforts under a comprehensive state-level rescue and rehabilitation policy.

Sunitha's strategy is to move from several successful state policies to an encompassing national mandate. The Problem Widespread trafficking of children for sex is a grim reality in India.

It is a problem that hides behind underground networks, criminal gangs, corrupt officials, and a culture of impunity. These barriers obstruct society's view of the scale and intricacies of trafficking. It becomes difficult to determine the impact trafficking has on children and families.

The barriers block the kinds of coordinated, consistent programs needed to combat the problem. One study of four major cities—Bombay, Calcutta, Hyderabad, and Delhi—found about two million prostitutes, 40 percent of whom were under About a quarter were under More comprehensive numerical data are hard to find because only girls in known brothels were counted.

Girls working as bartenders or waitresses who double as prostitutes and girls trafficked for pornography and sex tourism would expand both the overall number and the percentage of prostitutes who are children.

Once a young girl is under the control of a brothel, pimp, or agent, she undergoes a rough introduction or "breaking in," to her new profession.

She is gang-raped, hit, given drugs and alcohol, and locked up. Compounding this abuse is constant exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, the end of her education if it ever beganand the start of a life of a social outcast.

Dr. Sunitha Krishnan I got to know Dr. Sunitha Krishnan when I was researching human trafficking and measures to prevent it. I thought she might be a person related to the media or an NGO. Today 30th July is World Day Against Trafficking in Persons. As practically the entire world grapples with the problem of human trafficking either as a source, destination or a transit; India takes another bold step to fight this organized crime from all ends making it one of . Sunitha Krishnan is galvanizing India’s battle against sexual slavery by uniting government, corporations and NGOs to end human trafficking. Why you should listen Each year, some two million women and children, many younger than 10 years old, are bought and sold around the globe.

The psychological repercussions are so deep as to be unfathomable. Virtually all of these children have been "trafficked" in some way. Whether they are sold by their parents to pay a debt, tricked by relatives bearing false promises of employment, kidnapped from their villages, or lured off the streets, all are too young to consent legally to sexual intercourse, let alone consent to providing sex for money.

Child prostitution is illegal, of course, yet the persistence of trafficking is not solely a problem of poor law enforcement. The Indian National Plan of Action deals with children in prostitution, but like most other government documents, it does not recognize child trafficking per se as an issue for action.

Trafficking is, however, the mechanism that supplies children to brothels, pedophiles, and pornography rings.Sunitha Krishnan is making it possible for India's government and citizen organizations to manage jointly a range of protective and rehabilitative services for children who have been trafficked for commercial sexual exploitation.

Sunitha Krishnan has dedicated her life to rescuing women and children from sex slavery, a multimilion-dollar global market.

Sunitha krishnan

In this courageous talk, she tells three powerful stories, as well as her own, and calls for a more humane approach to helping these young victims rebuild their lives. Sunitha Krishnan has dedicated her life to rescuing women and children from sex slavery, a multimilion-dollar global market.

In this courageous talk, she tells three powerful stories, as well as her own, and calls for a more humane approach to helping these young victims rebuild their lives. View the profiles of professionals named Sunitha Krishnan on LinkedIn. There are 30 professionals named Sunitha Krishnan, who use LinkedIn to exchange information, ideas, and opportunities.

Prajwala is a pioneering anti-trafficking organization working on the issue of sex trafficking and sex crime. Established in the year in South India, Prajwala has pan India and International operations. Prajwala works on the five pillars of Prevention, Protection, Rescue, Rehabilitation & Reintegration.

Sunitha Krishnan. CURRENT NEWS. attheheels.coma Krishnan.

Sunitha Krishnan – Anti-trafficking crusader! — Voices of Youth

11K likes. Dr Sunitha Krishnan is a rare breed of individual who has committed her life as a fulltime volunteer in Prajwala. A.

Sunitha Krishnan | Speaker | TED