Taming of the shrew character motivations

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Taming of the shrew character motivations

Prior to the first act, an induction frames the play as a "kind of history" played in front of a befuddled drunkard named Christopher Sly who is tricked into believing that he is a lord. The play is performed in order to distract Sly from his "wife," who is actually Bartholomew, a servant, dressed as a woman.

In the play performed for Sly, the "shrew" is Katherina, the eldest daughter of Baptista Minola, a lord in Padua. Numerous men, including Gremio and Tranio, deem Katherina an unworthy option for marriage because of her notorious assertiveness and willfulness.

On the other hand, men such as Hortensio and Gremio are eager to marry her younger sister Bianca. The plot thickens when Lucentio, who has recently come to Padua to attend university, falls in love with Bianca. In the meantime, Petruchioaccompanied by his servant Grumio, arrives in Padua from Verona.

Hearing this, Hortensio recruits Petruchio as a suitor for Katherina. He also has Petruchio present Baptista a music tutor named Litio Hortensio in disguise. Thus, Lucentio and Hortensio, attempt to woo Bianca while pretending to be the tutors Cambio and Litio.

Katherina agrees to marry Petruchio after seeing that he is the only man willing to counter her quick remarks; however, at the ceremony Petruchio makes an embarrassing scene when he strikes the priest and drinks the communion wine.

After the wedding, Petruchio takes Katherina to his home against her will. Once they are gone, Gremio and Tranio disguised as Lucentio formally bid for Bianca, with Tranio easily outbidding Gremio. However, in his zeal to win, he promises much more than Lucentio actually possesses.

Leslie illustration of Act 4, Scene 3 Petruchio upbraiding the tailor for making an ill-fitting dress. In Verona, Petruchio begins the "taming" of his new wife.

Along the way, they meet Vincentio, who is also on his way to Padua, and Katherina agrees with Petruchio when he declares that Vincentio is a woman and then apologises to Vincentio when Petruchio tells her that he is a man. Back in Padua, Lucentio and Tranio convince a passing pedant to pretend to be Vincentio and confirm the dowry for Bianca.

The man does so, and Baptista is happy for Bianca to wed Lucentio still Tranio in disguise.

Taming of the shrew character motivations

Bianca, aware of the deception, then secretly elopes with the real Lucentio to get married. Tranio still disguised as Lucentio appears, and the pedant acknowledges him to be his son Lucentio. In all the confusion, the real Vincentio is set to be arrested, when the real Lucentio appears with his newly betrothed Bianca, revealing all to a bewildered Baptista and Vincentio.

Lucentio explains everything, and all is forgiven by the two fathers. Meanwhile, Hortensio has married a rich widow. In the final scene of the play there are three newly married couples; Bianca and Lucentio, the widow and Hortensio, and Katherina and Petruchio.

Because of the general opinion that Petruchio is married to a shrew, a good-natured quarrel breaks out amongst the three men about whose wife is the most obedient.

Petruchio proposes a wager whereby each will send a servant to call for their wives, and whichever comes most obediently will have won the wager for her husband.

Katherina is the only one of the three who comes, winning the wager for Petruchio. She then hauls the other two wives into the room, giving a speech on why wives should always obey their husbands. The play ends with Baptista, Hortensio and Lucentio marvelling at how successfully Petruchio has tamed the shrew.

Sources[ edit ] Although there is no direct literary source for the induction, the tale of a tinker being duped into believing he is a lord is one found in many literary traditions.

Katherine and Petruchio by James Dromgole Linton c.The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare, by its uncertain relationship with another Elizabethan play with an almost identical plot but different wording and character names, A Pleasant Conceited Historie, called the .

Character Analysis Katherine Minola Bookmark this page Manage My Reading List Like many other of Shakespeare's comedies, The Taming of the Shrew features . Ultimately, the characters in The Taming of the Shrew blur the lines between reality and illusion, making them one and the same.

In the beginning of the play, the small part of dialogue concerning Christopher Sly shows the phenomenon of illusion becoming reality. Many lives are ruled by a need to fit in and conform to the ideals of society. William Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew centers around the two sisters, Bianca and Katherine and their marriages.

Keeping track of the characters in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew can get confusing because it is a play within a play, and it starts out focusing on some minor characters that play no role. A summary of Themes in William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Taming of the Shrew and what it means.

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Motivations Of Taming Of The Shrew Characters | Study Guides and Book Summaries